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HyMAP

HyMAP is the acronym for Hybrid Materials for Artificial Photosynthesis, the title of the ERC Consolidator Grant awarded to Dr. V. A. de la Peña O’Shea in the 2014 call. The challenging process of Artificial Photosynthesis is based on the use of solar light to convert CO2 and water into energy-useful compounds like CO, methane, methanol and hydrogen – just as green plants do, but replacing the sugars they produce by those simpler compounds. HyMAP aims at developing a new generation of hybrid organo-inorganic materials that are able to efficiently promote, by photocatalytic and photoelectrochemical reactions, the chemical transformations ecompassed in artificial photosynthetic processes. In order to reach this goal, the HyMAP team investigates materials and processes and different scales – from nanoscaled catalysts to pilot-plant reactors.

Photoactivated Processes Unit, IMDEA Energy

NEWS


2019-02-22

Researchers watch molecules in a light-triggered catalyst ring 'like an ensemble of bells'

An international team has used an X-ray laser at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory to get an incredibly detailed look at what happens to the structure of a model photocatalyst when it absorbs light. The researchers used extremely fast laser pulses to watch the structure change and see the molecules vibrating, ringing "like an ensemble of bells", says lead author Kristoffer Haldrup, a senior scientist at Technical University of Denmark (DTU). This study paves the way for deeper investigation into these processes, which could help in the design of better catalysts for splitting water into hydrogen and oxygen. "We get to investigate the very basics of photochemistry, namely how exciting the electrons in the system leads to some very specific changes in the overall molecular structure", says Tim Brandt van Driel, a co-author from DTU who is now a scientist at Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS, the SLAC's X-ray laser).


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ABOUT US

The HyMAP project is developed by the researchers of the Photoactivated Processes Unit at the IMDEA Energy Institute. The Photoactivated Processes Unit started its activities in January 2016. The main objective of the Unit is to develop of multifunctional materials, reactors and devices able to efficiently harvest light to drive photon-activated processes for energy and environmental application. In addition is also oriented to the deep understanding light-Material Interactions and its effect in the performance.

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